Generation gap narrows for Baby Boomer and Gen Y globetrotters

On November 25, 2009 at 08:00 AM

Expedia.com.au survey reveals that Baby Boomers make up for lost time as the travel bug bites with age

While one in five Baby Boomers have never left Australian shores, astoundingly one in ten Gen Yers have already travelled overseas more than 10 times in their short lives, according to new research* from Expedia.com.au™, operated by Expedia Inc., the world’s leading online travel company.

The research, which examined the travel trends of the two generations, found that almost a third of Generation Y Aussies (i.e. those aged between 18 and 29) travelled overseas before the age of ten, compared to only 6% of their Baby Boomer parents (i.e. those aged between 50 and 64) at the same age.

However, despite not having had the same travel opportunities in their youth as their worldly Gen Y kids, Aussie Baby Boomers are doing everything they can to make up for lost time, with almost one in five (17%) saying they holiday three to five times per year and a quarter (23%) having travelled overseas more than 10 times in their lifetime so far.  

In another sign of the generation gap closing, and dispelling the myth that only young people book travel online,70% of Baby Boomers say they have booked their trips through the internet.

Who’s following in whose footsteps?

Europeranked as the number one dream travel destination for both Baby Boomers (55%) and Generation Y (68%). For Gen Y, this was followed by Asia (49%) and North America (44%), while Baby Boomers chose destinations a little closer to home as runners-up: New Zealand (50%) and Australia (43%).

Almost half (45%) of Aussie Baby Boomers have visited Asia, closely followed by Europe (44%) and New Zealand (41%). For Gen Yers, a similar number (47%) have also visited Asia, followed by Europe (30%) and North America (26%).

The Destination ‘Bucket List’ – Baby Boomers vs. Gen Y:

 

 

BABY BOOMERS

 

 

GEN Y

1

Europe

 

1

Europe

2

New Zealand

 

2

Asia

3

Australia

 

3

North America

4

North America

 

4

New Zealand

5

PacificIslands

 

5

Australia

The roads less travelled

The survey indicated that both Baby Boomers and Gen Yers generally like to travel to tried-and-tested destinations and give the more off-the-beaten-track ones such as South America and Africa a pass. A tiny one in twenty Baby Boomers and Gen Yers have explored South America, whilst Africa has been tackled by only one in ten Baby Boomers and a mere one in twenty Gen Yers.

Gen Y lap up luxury leaving Baby Boomers to the basics

The research also showed that, contrary to popular belief, Gen Yers thumb their nose at backpacking and adventure holidays – often considered a rite of passage for younger generations – in favour of luxury travel. More than one in ten (13%) Gen Yers rank luxurious breaks at the top of their holiday wish list, whereas only 3% of Baby Boomers are enticed by indulgence. A quarter of Gen Yers (24%) believes the quality of transport, accommodation and restaurants is paramount to their holiday experience.

Louise Crompton, Marketing Manager for Expedia.com.au said: “Our survey is interesting because it demonstrates that, apart from small differences in preferences, travel is universally loved by both generations. Despite the perception of a vast generation gap, there are a lot of similarities between what Aussie Gen Yers and Baby Boomers want from their travel experiences and the places they visit. The beauty of travel is that there is well and truly something for everyone, young and old.”

“With both generations almost equally comfortable using the internet to research and book their travel, the world really is their oyster. A travel website like Expedia.com.au allows you to research and book your very own unique trip in a single site that provides a myriad of tools to help you design the perfect holiday,” she said.

Notes to the Editor

*About the survey

Pureprofile fielded the online survey on behalf of Expedia.com.au™ and Expedia.co.nz between the 1st and 7th September 2009 among a nationwide cross-section of 1000 adults aged 18+ in Australia. The data was weighted to be representative of the total Australian population on the basis of gender, location and age. With probability samples of this size, one can say with 95 per cent certainty that the results for the sample have a sampling error of plus or minus two percentage points.

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